Some have the goal to start their own charity. Create their own 501(c)3 or charitable organization. A project that they can control with a board of directors, have fundraisers and events, and maybe even do a little more to impact our society and those in need. I’m writing this article for those ambitious souls that want to start a legitimate non-profit charity.

Being audited is one of the most stressful and dreaded experiences a taxpayer can go through. It’s a wonderful blessing to live in America, and paying taxes comes with that privilege, but enforcement is a reality. Whatever the case may be or the reason for you being audited, there are certainly some things you can do that will help you through the experience.

Partnerships are an amazing thing. So many businesses succeed because they are a partnership. However, if not properly structured and maintained, with lots of communication, they can destroy a business.

Wouldn’t it be nice if you could get a little help from Uncle Sam as well as a tax write-off for some of that pet food, vet bills, or even that big price tag at the breeder? Well, there might just be an option to save some taxes in the process.

Here is a list of the TOP 10 things TO do, or NOT do, in order to avoid an audit with the IRS. As many of you can imagine, an audit can be expensive and time-consuming, not to mention, emotionally draining experience. Please take these to heart.

Remember the good old days when you could write-off 100% your new SUV or Truck under the 179 deduction?  That was the wild wild west (pre-2006), and then we all became quickly familiar with the $25,000 cap on writing off these gas guzzling vehicles. However, the game has changed with possibly an unintended loophole under the new Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA).  The silver bullet: Bonus Depreciation.

Things have changed in 2018 when it comes to writing off meals and food expenses in your small business. Entrepreneurs, have to reevaluate their budget for the food and dining.

The U.S. tax rules that apply to ownership and dispositions of U.S. real estate by foreign persons are different in some important respects from the rules that apply to U.S. persons. Also, property managers are under special rules when managing property for foreign owners, and sellers to foreign investors can be classified as withholding agents (which have important obligations and liabilities associated with the classification).